Lost Arts studio

A lot of the fiber arts I enjoy are things like tatting, netmaking, chair caning, and even weaving, where people will come up to me when I demonstrate and solemnly tell me, "That's a lost art."

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Location: SW Outer Nowhere, Michigan, United States

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a chicken. (With apologies to Peter Steiner.)



09 April 2007

Easter Egg Dye

I'm no Julie, but after the child and I dyed Easter eggs on Saturday, I looked at the dye in the mugs and wondered what else I had that I could dye.

We were about to leave for an indoor Easter-egg hunt, but I grabbed a little 11-gram ball of tussah silk, made a quick forearm skein, and dipped a section in each mug.

I didn't have time to re-heat the dyes, and silk never seems to take up much dye anyway, so after rinsing and washing in shampoo and rinsing again, then letting my little skein dry by the woodstove, I was left with this:
Most of the blue and purple rinsed out, and the green, orange, and yellow all got lighter. The color this silk really seemed to love was the pink!

I don't think I'm going to become a yarn dyer, but it was quick and fun, and does give me some ideas for the quantities of tussah silk I still have.

Double Knitting Knit-Along

Here is the last segment of the tubular double-knitting knit-along:

Purl-side-out Tube, Second Method:

*Knit one stitch with yarn in back.
Slip one stitch purlwise with yarn in back.*
Repeat.

Discussion:
The yarn stays in back for this method, just knit and slip.
Although you knit each stitch, the tube forms purl side out, because you are knitting the back layer and slipping the front layer.

The yarn travels around the tube counter-clockwise if you are looking down at the top of the tube. Two rows equal one round.

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1 Comments:

Blogger Julie said...

Oh, pretty! I'm still not too good at pastels. Some personal failing, I'm sure.

And SILK! I've never had the nerve to try dyeing silk. Very brave.

(If you soak ahead of time, and heat, the colors would stick better, but you know this. And silk can't be heated much past 180F or it loses it's shine - for next time.)

11:17 AM  

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